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Thoughts on the Boston Marathon bombings, One Year Later

Marathon_Victims

One year after two bombs exploded at the finish line of the Boston Marathon, we’re looking back at how horrible that day was and how resilent the city proved to be.

First, here are my thoughts:

“I was in the newsroom at WMUR when we heard over the Boston police scanner that there were two major explosions near the finish line. Unfortunately, in my line of work I have no time to reflect, I can only react to the updates as they come in. We work closely in conjunction with WCVB, and together, we delivered as much information as we possibly could in order to keep the public safe. Several hundred runners were from New Hampshire, and we had some of our crews near the finish line when the bombs went off, so we were very concerned about what was going on in the city.

I also found myself texting everyone I know that lives in Boston, and checking for Facebook updates to ensure they were OK.

Frankly, this couldn’t have come on a quieter Monday, and I guess that’s the point. Selfish cowards can terrorize a happy, wonderful event and in so doing, change hundreds of lives forever.

What I find most amazing is the city’s resolve after the bombings, and how everyone rallied around each other so united. It’s encouraging to know that in tragedy, you can actually still turn to your neighbors. It taught me that people are generally good and very resilient.”

Next, we have Tim Wirzburger’s thoughts:

“I was also in New Hampshire at the time. I was a student at Saint Anselm and I was in the library when twitter blew up with images and news of what was going on. Every year, Saint A’s has a group of 30-40 students run the race together so obviously I immediately thought of them. I remember texting all of my friends who were there and trying to get in touch them to make sure they were okay. In all of the chaos and confusion, some of them didn’t text back for an hour or two later. It was obviously a scary afternoon.

The official Saint Anselm twitter account was sending out memos telling students that if they could get in touch with any of the group in Boston, to let them know immediately. They were trying to compile a list to make sure that everyone is okay. A few hours later, they were able to announce that all of the Saint Anselm students, faculty, and staff that were there were accounted for and okay. It was 9 or 10 by the time they got back to campus, but they came back to a huge crowd of students who were waiting for them. Many of them brothers, sisters, boyfriends, girlfriends, parents, cousins. It was an emotional night. We were very lucky as a community that everyone came home. It definitely puts things in perspective. I’m so proud to be from Boston and of the way that the city responded. Rest in peace to Sean Collier, Martin Richard, and everyone else who fell victim to this attack. You will not be forgotten.”

Also, we have thoughts from Anthony Capalino:

“The night before the marathon bombing I was at my friend’s house with a bunch of my buddies and somehow the topic of 9/11 came up. We all agreed that being in second grade when that happen we didn’t really understand what actually happened and if it happened today it would be different.

The next day i go to work with my uncle and it was an ordinary Monday on the job site the. When we started to slow down for the day I got one of those ESPN alerts on my phone saying “Police investigating explosions near finish line in Boston”. So i thought to my self oh maybe a gas explosion or something thinking no way someone could pull this cowardly act on a day like today. Then my sister calls me frantically asking where i am and i said working why and she said two bombs when off in Boston. Bombs? I said and she said yeah it was crazy. I told my uncle and we turned on the news on the radio which told us that two bombs had gone off near the finish line.

After hearing the news we packed up for the day and headed home just in case anything else happened. Then my other uncle who was in Boston at a bar on Boylston street called my dad flipping out yelling on the phone and my dad couldn’t really hear him but he said it was one of the scariest days of his life saying he saw people with blood on them and everyone crying and running. I am truly proud to be from Boston not because of the bombings but because the way that the city came together after them and stayed Boston Strong. Thank you to the Boston Police for protecting us and rest in peace to everyone who lost their lives because of this attack. David Ortiz did say it best, “This is our f$cking City.”

About KC Downey - @kc_downey

KC is the "head coach" of the Sports of Boston, LLC blog network. Follow him on Twitter: @kc_downey

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