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Brad Marchand: Little Ball of Disappointment

(Photo Courtesy by Rick Osentoski of USA Today Sports)

After the disappointing series loss to the Canadiens, I was trying to figure out how did the Bruins collapse? Was it the lack of production of the first line? Was it the loss of Dennis Seidenberg and the Bruins could not replace him correctly? While these questions did signify a mistake the players and management made, there is one glaring issue I have with the series. Brad Marshmallow Marchand missed key goal-scoring opportunities in golden situations to put the Boston on the board.

He is a prolific goal scorer, right?

In the past three regular seasons, Marchand has an average of 23.6 goals a season.

Marchand has been the one of the Bruins’ best goal scorers. The aptly named Noseface Killa is on the Bruins’ squad for two reasons: to make the other team angry enough to take penalties and to score goals. Marchand was too focused on the former, and acted like a complete jackass. For example, he was favoring the wrong leg after a hit from Detroit’s Brenden Smith. Marchand needed to get his head on straight, and focus on his gameplay. So, it sounds like he did not do so well in the scoring department, but what kind of numbers did the Little Ball of Hate finish his postseason with?

Absolutely No Significant Stat Whatsoever

Marchand finished off his 2014 postseason with 5 assists and ZERO goals. Yes, you are reading that correctly, Marchand had no goals this postseason. This all-telling statistic is absolutely ridiculous for how talented he is. Now, you might be saying he did not have good chances, and Krejci had no goals either so he deserves some of the blame. Firstly, Krejci’s role on the team is to set the play and get assists. While, Krejci should have been much better and deserves to be ridiculed, Marchand has no excuse at all for his lack of production. Marchand missed the entire net, as Carey Price was nowhere to be found in Game 3. Next, Marchand completely missed the net, when he was right in front of the net and Price was sprawling on the ice in Game f****** 7!

Trade Talks

Ultimately, if Marchand does not grow up and start putting the puck in the back of the net, his time in Boston will come to a screeching halt. There were already talks last offseason to trade Marchand, and I am sure the Bruins will be hearing offers this offseason as well. Do not get me wrong; when Marchand performs I love his play. He gets the Bruins powerplays and scores goals. However, when he plays stupid, I want to rip the playoff beard out of my face.

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Discussion

4 comments for “Brad Marchand: Little Ball of Disappointment”

  1. Fair point on Marchand, and his dissapointing play this offseason is an issue that needs to be addressed.

    However, you missed a major reason he’s on this team: He kills penalties. Yes I know, the Bruins have plenty of PK guys (Bergy, Campbell, Paille, Eriksson, Kelly, etc). BUT Marchand was among league leaders in PK goals and he has tremendous chemistry with Bergeron.

    Besides, after the Bruins have gotten eliminated by a faster team, do you really want to get rid of one of our quickest players?

    Posted by Tim Wirzburger | May 20, 2014, 4:20 pm
  2. While Marchand and Paille are probably the two fastest guys on the team, they did not deter the Canadiens all that much. (a lofty 1st line is probably the main reason but that’s a different argument).

    Sure, PK goals is a nice stat during the regular season, but these goals did not help them get past the 2nd round. Also, this chemistry Marchand and Bergeron have is just Bergeron’s greatness spilling over to Marchand’s stat sheet. For example, during the disappointing 2005-2006 season, Bergeron’s line-mate Glen Murray had 24 goals and 53 points. Then, Bergeron went down with concussion issues and Murray only lasted in the league for another two years before his exit. Granted, Murray might have been old but he never saw his offensive production again since Bergeron’s injury.

    Posted by Brad Lewis | May 21, 2014, 2:04 pm
  3. Great points there Brad. Bergeron could develop chemistry with a traffic cone.

    My biggest concerns are A) The speed again. I know Marchy’s speed wasn’t much of a factor in the Montreal series, but when we look back and say okay we have to get faster, is trading away our fastest “offensive-minded” forward the answer?

    And B) The PK. Statistically speaking, the Bruins weren’t as strong on the PK as other years either in the regular season or the playoffs. With Soderberg playing so well. Chris Kelly is going to be gone. If you let Marchand go too, you’re getting rid of 2 of your top PK guys.

    Posted by Tim Wirzburger | May 22, 2014, 11:57 am
  4. Fair enough, I would rather have Marchand than Kelly any day.

    Posted by Brad Lewis | May 23, 2014, 6:15 pm

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